Because You Compare

When life gets in the way, it’s easy to forget all the good things. At times we wonder what could have happened had we choose a different decision last year, or we followed our parents’ advice, or we followed the rules and never tried something new.

These narratives arise for one reason: We compare ourselves to others. 

I learned this the hard way. Every time I compare, nothing good happens. Or maybe I couldn’t remember anything good.

Comparison creates jealousy. Comparison makes us think we have nothing and we are nothing.

Comparison makes us discontent of everything we have.

When we compare ourselves to anyone, it robs the joy we could have experienced with what we already have. It makes us think that something is missing and something is not right. Something must be changed or something must be stopped.

And everyone is a victim.

The person we feel envy with also compare themselves to someone with a higher disposition in life. And that person being compared also compare themselves to other person. It’s never-ending. That’s how the brain works. And that’s why we are always discontent.

In his book, The Little Book of Contentment, Leo Babauta writes:

“We are discontent with our lives because our fantasies about how life should be don’t come true: that the weather be perfect, that we have a beautiful house and a great job, and always be at the center of peace and happiness and excitement, and surrounded by people who love us, and that we never lose anyone important, and that all the great things in our lives never change.”

Comparing is the source of unhappiness. It’s the reason we’re not happy with what we have. And the reason we’re not satisfied with our lives.

If we can only stop comparing, then maybe our lives will be better.

Why not be happy with what you have?

Why not be happy with what you can do?

Why not accept the things you don’t have control over with?

Learn to be content. Contentment is the path to happiness.

“Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.” ― Epicurus

Maybe your friend needs this, share it.
Share on FacebookEmail this to someoneTweet about this on Twitter
 

Jade Panugan

Some interesting questions about life and human behavior: What if there’s no money? Why we often feel the urge to prove that we’re right and others are wrong? Why we get pissed off at someone not doing good things? Why we hate? Why it’s hard to be content? I don’t have all the answers, do you? Let’s chat.